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controversial comments by muslims and immigration. in the u.s. east coast prepares for the arrival of the hurricane. >> a first session of peace talks between israeli and palestinian leaders has wrapped up at the state department in washington shortly after u.s. and middle east peace envoy described the talks as productive. the meeting on thursday marks the first time in 20 months that the two sides have held former in the gut -- formal negotiations. the u.s. president has said a timeline of one year to hammer out a new peace deal. >> talks between the israelis and palestinians have been on hold for almost two years. the fact the two sides are meeting again is down to the intense diplomatic efforts of president barack obama and his secretary of state, hillary clinton. >> i know the decision to sit at this table was not easy. we understand the suspicion and skepticism that so many feel, born out of years of conflict and frustrated hopes. >> the israelis and palestinians admit the talks will be difficult. netanyahu said painful concessions and -- concessions are required from both si
on earth. what does the evolution of life on our planet tell us about the likelihood that alien civilizations exist? in the second of a two-part series, we will ask one of the originators of the dark matter theory, dr. joel primack and nancy ellen abrahams. q >>> this is the second session with two extraordinary people, nancy abrahams wosay lawyer, a song writer, a spouse, and the coauthor of this volume, which is quite breathtaking. the view from the center of the universe. discovering our extraordinariy place in the cosmows. a new book. -- cosmos. highly placed and the coauthor is sitting right here, his name is joel preand he is one of the world's most successful and recognized cosmonthlygists, astro first cysts. and this is a tour of the universe benefiting by the extraordinary breakthroughs of a series of telescopes, the head of which is the leading telescope is the hubble telescope which is still functioning. now, the hubble is a product of nasa. so you must have high regard for nasa? is that deminished in any way? >> all of us scientists are enormously grateful for the go
'm bob abernathy. it's good to have you with us. another historic event for pope benedict the 16th this week. his four-day visit to the yinged kingdom. king henry viii broke tes with the roma catholic church almost 500 years ago. as kim reports, benedict's trip has not been without controversy. >> pope benedict went to the uk at the invitation of queen elizabeth ii, the official head of england. the only was john pall ii in 1982. he was greeted with an outpouring of affection. pope benedict has faced outright protests. one major issue is outrage over the clergy sex abuse crisis still swirling over many parts of europe. at the beginning of the trip, benedict admitted the church was not quick and decisive to take the necessary measures to combat the crisis. another is between roman catholics and the anglo-american community. last october the vatican made it easier for disaffected anglocans to become catholic. a highlight is the trip is the -- but perhaps the biggest challenge has been making the case for faith and a nation known for growing secularism. throughout the trip benedict ca
>> the freed american hiker sarah shourd speaking out over a year in iranian prison. she will join us to discuss her ordeal and her campaign to free the other hikers, her fiancÉ shane bauer and joshua fattal remain in jail and iran. appalachia rising. over 100 arrested outside the white house protesting mountaintop removal. the israeli navy detained a boat carrying nine jewish activists attempting to break the gaza blockade. israel has resumed some of building in the west bank. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. the c.i.a. has drastically increased bombing campaign in the mountains of pakistan in recent weeks. according to the new york times" the cia has launched at let 20 attacks with armed drone aircraft so far in september, the most ever during a single month. according to one pakistani intelligence official, the recent drone attacks of not killed any senior taliban or al qaeda leaders. many senior operatives have already fled the region to escape the c.i.a. drone campaign. mean what come u.s. apac
>>> hello there. welcome to "newsline." glad you to join us. it's thursday, september 9th, 8:00 a.m. in tokyo. i'm catherine kobayashi. >>> energy giant bp has concluded that the catastrophic gulf oil spill was caused by a linked series of mechanical and human failures involving multiple companies. its report has immediately been met by a backlash. the investigation was conducted by a team of bp and outside experts, and disclosed on wednesday. the report blames eight interlinked findings for the incident or accident including the poor quality of cement used to contain hydrocarbons at the sea bottom and the rig crew's delay in noticing irregular ates. outgoing bp representative tony hayward says a series of events led to the tragedy. he insisted transocean and others are responsible. transocean immediately issued a comment calling the report a self-serve attempt to conceal the real cause of the explosion that started the disaster. it said bp had made a series of cost-saving decisions that increased the risk of an accident. the accident in april in the gulf of mexico left 11 dead an
& ethics "newsweek"ly is provided by -- >>> welcome. it's good to he you with us. as the country observes the ninth anniversary of the september 11th terrorist attacks, there's been an extraordinary national conversation about the challenges of religious diversity and the boundaries of tolerance. there were protests and condemnations from around the world over a small independent florida church's threatened plan to burn the koran. secretary of state hillary clinton called the plan disrespectful and disgraceful. and general david petraeus, the top u.s. and nato commander in afghanistan and defense secretary robert gates said the act could endanger american troops. the debate came on top of another controversy over plans to build an islamic cultural center near the site of ground zero in new york. at a news conference on friday, president obama called for religious tolerance. >> we have to make sure that we don't start turning on each other, and i will do everything that i can as long as i'm president of the united states to remind the american people that we are one nation under god and we
used them sparingly, but president obama has appointed special envoys to deal with everything from climate change to the closing of guantanamo bay. but with special envoys come special problems. >> the dger of, of having only special envoys is that you, is that you get mixed signals, you get wires crossed. but at the end of the day, i think that's a risk worth taking. >> will the obama administration's reliance on these special negotiators advance u.s. goals in places like afghanistan and the middle east, or are there too many cooks in the kitchen? next, on great decisions. >> in a democracy, agreement is not essential, but participation is. join us as we discuss today's most critical global issues. join us as we discuss today's most critical global issues. join us for great decisions. [instrumental music] >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association, inspiring americans to learn more about the world. funding for great decisions is provided by the carnegie corporation of new york, the starr foundation, shell international and the european commission. great decis
churches plan to burn the quran on a september 11. general petraeus warns it could endanger u.s. troops abroad. lee will speak with the gainesville student was organizing a series of town to events and we will be joined by the cannes mayor, the first openly gay mayor and was started by the florida church's turn his campaign "how does it feel to be a problem? being young and arab in america." we will speak with the author moustafa bayoumi. 13 dead and hundreds wounded in a police crackdown over protest -high food prices.-proces we will speak with raj patel. going to jail for friend and someone on facebook? rod coronado is ordered back to prison after accepting a friend request on facebook. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. president obama is expected to unveil additional economic proposals today that will include an end to bush era tax cuts for the wealthiest americans. in a speech from milwaukee, the white house says obama will call on lawmakers to extend the tax cuts for 98% of americans while returnin
>>> hi, everyone, welcome to the "journal" on dw-tv. >> thank you for joining us. >> the helines -- iranian president mahmoud ahmadinejad repeats his assertion that washington planned the 9/11 terrorist attacks. >> petrobras raises $70 billion to fund offshore oil reserves. m and the first athletes had to the commonwealth games and concerns that india is not up to staging the event. i >>> u.s. president barack obama has said that there are a host of options available to the united states and its allies if sanctions against iran failed to lead to cooperation on its nuclear program. thursday in his speech to the un general assembly, obama called on iran to resume dialogue with world powers regarding its nuclear programs. for his part, iranian president mahmoud ahmadinejad repeated his claims that washington orchestrated the september 11 attacks. >> iranian president mahmoud ahmadinejad address the media friday on the sidelines of the u.n. general assembly. he repeated his claims that the united states government was responsible for the september 11 terror attacks in 2001. on thursd
now!" >> it is a proud time for all of us as colombians. i want to share with all of you this infinite luck, to have my children next to me after seven years of not sing them. >> after more thanix years of captivity, being held hostage by colombian rebel group farc, former colombian presidential candidate ingrid betancourt was released in july 2008. she has just published a memoir "even silence has an end: my six years of captivity in the colombian jungle." we will speak with her to go first, the fbi raids eight homes and offices of anti-war activists in chicago and minneapolis. >> they wanted to see things related to trips to colombia and the middle east and related to the antiwar committee. >> we have done nothing wrong. [applause] on the other hand, the fbi asked today as they have always acted, to intimidate and disrupt the anti-war movement in the movement for peace and justice. >> we will be joined by two of the activists whose homes were raided, jess sundin of minneapolis and joe isobaer of chicago. will speak with former fbi special agents coleen rowley. all of that and more co
is not very solid. it's about $30 sml a years which which is peanuts compared to what the u.s. has with china, with the european union. but the potential is huge. >> rose: and we conclude with one of the most interesting entrepreneurs in all of china, he is jack ma. his company is alled alibaba. >> core competence of our companies, we have 20,000, grow from 18 people, now 20,000 people. and we focus a lot on the making sure the culture, everybody works for helping others instead of just making money. and we believe different from wall street, we believe customer number one, employee two, shareholder three. >> rose: customer one, employee, two, areholder three? >> yes, again, this is my religion. >> rose: russia and the world, china and technology when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: president obama came to office promising to reset relations with russia. he and russian president dmitry medvedev appeared to form a personal bond. they have since signed a nuclear arms reduction treaty-- now waiting to be r
!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. a federal appeals court has ruled u.s. corporations can no longer be sued for human rights violations abroad under the longstanding alien tort statute. and a little notice drilling thisonth, the second u.s. court of appeals ruled that alien tort claims can only be brought against individuals, not corporations. the ruling dismissed a lawsuit accusing the oil giant royal dutch shell of complicity in the murder and torture of nigerian activists including ken saro- wiwa. in a separate opinion, second circuit judge criticized the ruling writing -- a federal appeals court has issued a temporary order reinstating government funding for embryonic stem cell research. on tuesday, the u.s. court of appeals for the district of columbia circuit issued a stay of a lower court injunction that blocked the obama administration's reversal of bush-era restrictions on stem cell funding. the lower court had ruled the funding violates a 1996 law prohibiting federal money for any research that destroys or threatens human embryos. the funding wi
and reward stem involves several different brain regions that communicate using chemical signals called neurotransmitters. the this circuit helps us to repeat the behaviors that make us happy while avoiding those that make us miserable. but as any adult knows, pleasure is not always good for you. tonight we'll also explore particularly dangerous forms of pleasure-seeking, addiction. long considered to be a moral weakness, addiction is now understood to be a biological disease. finally, we will explore the role that emotions play in decision-making and social interaction. next month, in part two of the emotional brain, we will turn our focus to negative emotions such as fear and anxiety. joining us tonight, a group of scientists who have devoted their lives to understanding the emotional brain. daniel salzman, he studies how the brain assigns an emotional value to the information that it receives from the five senses. he is an assistant professor of sky tri and neuroscience at columbia university. wolfram schultz. he studies how the brain's reward systemsffect decision-making and learnin
>> relations between the u.s. and china, in recent years, have focused primarily on one thing, the economy. but both countries have agreed to expand high-level talks to include issues of strategic importance. china's military buildup, north korea, taiwan, and climate change, are now all on the agenda. >> china wants to avoid real security crises. on the other hand, also, i think, it does aspire to be a great power in a very full way. >> how will dialogue between the u.s. and china shape the coming decade? next, on great decisions. >> in a democracy, agreement is not essential, but participation is. join us as we discuss today's most critical global issues. join us as we discuss today's most critical global issues. join us for great decisions. [instrumental music] >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association, inspiring americans to learn more about the world. funding for great decisions is provided by the carnegie corporation of new york, the starr foundation, shell international and the european commission. great decisions is produced in association with th
mercedes benz lives by to this day. the best, or nothing. that is what drives us. >> additional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg. a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. ♪ >> from our studios in new york city, this is "charlie rose." ♪ >> charlie: sebastian pinera was elected president of chile in january with a mandate to create jobs and bolster the economy. he is chile's third richest citizen. 13 days before he took office, his country suffered one of the most devastating earthquakes in recorded history. he dubbed himself the reconstruction president and made earthquake recovery his top priority. he is here in new york for the united nations general assembly. i am very pleased to have him here at this table for the first time. first of all, welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> charlie: tell me about the earthquake and how you approached that. >> it was the fifth worst earthquake in the known history of mankind, and it s devastating. it was 10 days before we took office, and it really cost us first of all more than 500 lives. there are
important than editorial judgment? where is the drive for speed and mobility taking us? >> if online journalism came in a very fast, packaged vehicle, if turning to that next page of the news was as easy as turning the page of a magazine or a newspaper, we'd see people consuming even more news online. >> how is technology changing the way we produce, share, and find the news? that's our question today on "the future of news." >> a government without a tough and vibrant media of all sorts is not an option for the united states of america. >> more voices is always better for our industry, and more ways of distributing and more ways of reaching people and more ways that people can consume our media. >> so you're just gonna get everything, and you as a consumer have to choose. >> from the newseum in washington, d.c., this is "the future of news." welcome to the knight studio and our conversation about media and news in the digital age. i'm frank sesno. joining me today are two groundbreaking and digitally savvy reporters. mara schiavocampo of nbc is the first digital journalist in networ
americans popped so many pills. have psycho pharmaceuticals turned us into a zombie nation? or should we just go with the flow and embrace the brave new world of mood control? we'll ask new york magazine journalist ariel levy and washington psychiatrist dr. brian doyle. >> a.d.m. the nature of what's to come. >> welcome. ariel levy, you authored a cover story for "new york magazine" which we see here "what are you on?" and you described new york today to -- you say sound the alarm, there is a new drug epidemic in town and most of the city wants in on it. in certain circles of new york, it is regular table conversation. we have entered the golden age of self-medication. drugs have become like hair products or cosmetics. this is brain styling, not mind altering, and you have a serious point to make there, but what is the extent of what you see going on in new york? >> well, i mean, i think new york is the same town that brought you woody allen and brought you everybody having a psychiatrist. there not a great deal of stigma to being neurotic in new york. it is accepted to the point of mayb
is important d facebook is a consequee and very impressive comny. and social infmation will be used by gooe and by others, i should add, to make the quality of t results, the qlity of the experience that much better. e pore we foe about what your friendso with your permission, and i need sayhat about 500 times, we canctually use that t improve the experiencyou have o getting informatio that you ce about. in our case what we're actuallyo something building social information into allf ourroducts. so it won't ba social network the way peop think of facebook but rather social infortion about who your friends a, people that you interactith. and we have various ways in which we wl be collecting that informaon. >>e continue with the film wall street money never eeps with the director all i vertone and twof the jars josh brolin d ia laouf. the 2 o 008 market is re difficult to understand wi credit default swaps and insurae and all tha stuff. but we made it a backgrou. that's the way we treat it. we treed the crisis, it's all there. you parallel it. but we kept our eye on the foreground which is th
a pay raise, a six-hour day, a coast-wide contract, and a working hall run by us... human dignity, rank and file democracy and human dignity. but the shipowners, they thought we wanted revolution. well, at least that's what their papers said. [bell ringing] oh, yeah, here's another one. "the communist army plans the destruction of railroad and highway facilities to paralyze transportation and communication, while san francisco and the bay area are made a focal point in a red struggle for revolution and control of the government." [dramatic musical flourish] it's amazing the fear a bunch of wharf rats could stir up, and on may 9th, we went out on our first coast-wide strike, and the day of the shape-ups, the kickbacks, and the blue books was over. [light guitar music] ♪ >> ♪ step by step ♪ the longest march ♪ can be won ♪ can be won >> ♪ many stones ♪ can form an arch ♪ singly none ♪ singly none >> ♪ and by union ♪ what we will ♪ can be accomplished still >> ♪ drops of water ♪ turn a mill ♪ singly none ♪ singly none >> we don't intend to repeat our former
to nielsen research, and the number is growing every day. easy-to-use software is helping citizen journalists tell their stories, and professionals are using citizen sources more and more. >> we treat them as reliable sources of information, but, like we would with the police source, the courthouse source, and the capitol hill source, we verify that. >> ...these images literally streaming into us here at cnn. >> as traditional news media grapple with sinking budgets and shrinking newsrooms, can citizen journalism help fill the void? what role should citizen journalists play? that's our topic today on "the future of news." >> a government without a tough and vibrant media of all sorts is not an option for the united states of america. >> more eyes, more ears, more voices out there, and a more sophisticated audience as well, because it's the audience that's gonna keep us all honest. >> when citizen journalists want to be trusted, they have to do certain things to earn that trust. >> from the newseum in washington d.c., this is "the future of news." and welcome to the knight studio and our conve
and -- >> u.n. declaration? >> and the bill the rights, the u.s. charter. he was also interested in the revolutionary period. washington -- was fascinated to spend sometime with washington's documents. he knew a great deal about american history. he also knew a great deal about the american revolution, for example, that we like so many other democracies began with support from other countries. we began with french support. they have coalition support in iraq. he was well aware of the time that it took the us. to go from revolution to government, over a decade. he was interested in lincoln and the civil war. we talked a lot about lincoln and saw lincoln documents. then he had a very surprised q. he wanted to see documents of the precedence apparentltl really fascinates him, john quincy adams so we showed -- >> did he explain his interest? >> well, he didn't beyond the point that he was fascinated with the father son aspect of this adams senior -- bush senior, bush junior. >> i see. did he comment on anything like transparency of his from the documents? >> well, we tried to explain
tasks smoothly and easily. it allows us to move and to speak and to interact with our surroundings, requiring only minimal amount of effort. but when the brain is damaged, its true complex sit revealed. our subject this evening is the neurological disorders. these include parkinson's disease. stroke. huntington's disease and spinal chord injury. these conditions have taught us more about our brain than any other kind of brain disease. through parkinson's we have learned about movement. through stroke we have learned about speech. and through spinal cord injuries we have learned how thoughts give rise to actions. neurological diseases have been a topic of research for sent yees but-- century bus only recently have we developed effective treatments. this evening we will meet a group of scientists who have developeways to pair or bypass the disordered brain. john done o hew. his work allowed paralyzed patients to move and communicate using only their thoughts and a machine called a brain computer interface. he is a professor at brown university and co-founder of a company called cyber
years. and stars on the red carpet. the start of the venice film festival. >>> u.s. president barack obama is meeting middle eastern leaders in washington in a bid for a new mideast peace agreement. benjamin netanyahu and mahmoud abbas will hold face-to-face talks on thursday. netanyahu will meet obama for preliminary talks on issues such as the status of jerusalem and jewish building of settlements on the west bank's. later, he met a palestinian leader. jordan's king and egypt ruler were also attending. the talks came after hamas gunmen shot dead four jewish settlers. funerals for the victims were held earlier wednesday. >>> the u.s. and israeli leaders condemned the killings but said they would not derail the talks in washington. >> the message should go out to hamas and everybody else who is taking credit for these heinous crimes that this is not going to stop us from not only ensuring that a secure israel but also securing a longer lasting peace in which people throughout the region can take a different course. >> i think that the president's statement as an expression of our des
. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: the u.s. moved into what is planned as its final military phase in iraq today after ending its combat role. newshour correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage. >> reporter: cleaning up and packing-- that's what u.s. soldiers were doing on bases across iraq today. humvees rolled on to flatbed trucks and rows of equipment awaited transport home. last night, president obama marked the formal end of combat operations in iraq with a speech from the oval office. >> our combat mission is ending, but our commitment to iraq's future is not. this new approach reflects our long-term partnership with iraq , one based upon mutual interest and mutual respect. >> reporter: today, american military leaders marked the occasion with a change in command of the remaining 50,000 troops in iraq. vice president biden and defense secretary gates were among those presiding at the main u.s. military headquarters on the outskirts of baghdad. >> i pray that all those scarred by this war in iraq come to know the bond of lasting peac
on afghanistan? 1,201 u.s. soldiers ve died in afghanistan over the last nine years. as of july so far in 2010 alone. >> question, does president obama have an exit strategy for afghanistan? pat buchanan? >> he does not. they are moving away from the mid 2011 deadline from the beginning of withdrawal of troops to show we are committed for a longer period of time. john, the problem is, we can't win the war with the forces we have in there. everybody knows it. however, the country is divided. the administration is divided. they don't want to lose this war and have the taliban execute. they don't want to keep bleeding the country either. they have a real problem inin this sense. the liberal ring of the democratic party is moving away from the administration and there's a small antiwar conservative movement that is growing in the media and on capitol hill. so we are coming to a head in december when they had the december review of afghanistan. >> eleanor. >> i don't think they are working away from the july 2011 to begin exiting and they have a review planned for the end of december. and gener
at integrating ethnic minorities. these include using more teachers in schools who have immigrant backgrounds. the latest move comes amid heated debate on immigration unleashed by a member of the bundbank. he claims islam is to blame for the poor integration. germany's interior minister says these new measures aimed to improve the situation. >> he is a schoolteacher in essen. thes kurd was fortunate to havea mentor who encouraged him to go into education. the government wants to encourage ethnic minorities to go into teaching. he would like to e more to encourage ethnic minorities. >> there are ghettos were many turks live among themselves. they are isolated and have no opportunities. there needs to be more investment so they can escape isolation. >> germany's interior minister agrees. he says education is the key to integration. it is also at the core of the government range of measures. 50% of children from immigrant backgrounds leave school without a qualification. >> the most imptantlement is language, language, language -- the earlier the better. it begins with assessments in kindergarte
deal or face more bloodshed. >> those of us who are friends of israel must understand that true security for the jewish state requires an independent palestine, one that allows the palestinian people to live with dignity and opportunity. >those of us who are friends of the palestinians must understand that the rights of the palestinian people will only be won through peaceful means. >> reading the world of nuclear weapons is also a priority for obama. -- getting rid of nuclear- weapons in the world is also a priority for obama. >> the u.s. and the international committee seek a resolution to our differences with iran and the door remains open to diplomacy should they choose to walk through it. >> obama said that iran has yet to demonstrate the peaceful intentions of the program. the security council to impose new sanctions on iran after their refuse to suspends uranium production. >> at the request of the top u.s. commander in afghanistan, germany is focusing their efforts in the country. the german government has decided to withdraw reconnaissance troops and replace them with g
. and it may have been the lowest of the four elections held since u.s. forces ousted the taliban in 2001. there were also allegations of rampant fraud. >> we have seen ballot stuffing, proxy vote, underage voting, and also multiple voting. the most serious one is the ballot stuffing. our observers have observed in more than-- in around 280 centers in 28 provinces where the ballot stuffing did occur. >> reporter: afghanistan's leading election observation group called today for an independent investigation. also today president karzai spokesmen agreed that the fraud allegations warranted a second look. >> like any other election anywhere in the world this there are complaints there have been irregularities. but we are waiting for the respective organizations to investigate these complaints. and they should be the source of information to the afghan people about the existence of irregularities or fraud. >> reporter: at the same time, the afghan electoral commission criticized observer groups for being too quick to imply the election was tainted. still former foreign minister abdullah abdul
>> rose: welcome to our program. tonight, stephanie d'alessandro and john elderfield take us on a tour of a new matisse exhibit at the museum of modern art. >> it's a period when matisse really seemed to have very intently stopped the kind of work he was doing before and began searching for something and we can chart him through the evolution of "bathers by a river" in fact and then i think through "the exhibition" trying different modes of painting. bringing together different styles, avant-garde styles of the time, ways of making the surface of works very different and reworked. and we watch him not sure where he's going but excited about the possibility of a new kind of art for himself and we feel that for matisse that was a kind of radical invention. he said about "bathers by a river" and "moroccans" that they were two of the most pivotal works of his career. i think it's important he used the word "pivotal" and not "important." it suggests there was a change that those works brought about in his career and i think that's part of what that radical inventiois about. >> i t
of indonesians had protests in five cities. the top u.s. and nato commander in afghanistan, general petraeus, has warned the burning could endanger u.s. troops. the u.s.-led occupation of afghanistan seeking an additional 2,000 froops to join the 140,000 already on the ground. according to the associated press, general petraeus recently submitted request to nato command. it's unclear how many new troops would be americans. the associate press is also reporting the u.s. now expects to spend around $6 billion a year on training and backing the afghan military after u.s. troops are supposed to begin withdrawing next year. in iraq, 12 people were killed and dozens wounded sunday in a gun fight involving u.s. troops. iraqi forces called in u.s. backup after iraqi militants attacked a military compound in baghdad. it was first known firefight involving u.s. troops in the iraqi capital since the nominal end of the u.s. combat mission last week. in bahrain, a government crackdown on opposition and human rights activists has escalated with a new round of arrests. over the weekend 23 people were detained o
in disguise because it has forced us to double of rate of our productivity and have no doubt that inherent in our spirit the more enemies we have, the more united and hard we work. >> rose: mahmoud ahmadinejad for the hour. next. >> rose: mahmoud ahmadinejad, the president of iran, is back in new york city. the rituals of his yearly visit are now familiar. he speaks to members of the press, he holds breakfast meetings and a lot of other meetings at the united nations. he address it is u.n. general assembly. his strip often accompanied by developing events. this year was the release of american hiker sarah shourd while two other hikers-- shane bauer and joshua fatale-- remain in an iranian jail accused of espionage. iran has been sanctioned four times by the security council for its failure to comply with the u.n. nuclear investigative agency the i.a.e.a. the obama administration, europe japan and even some arab nations have followed with some additional sanctions. some are very clear that a military strike should remain on the table if the sanctions does not work. one of those is former pr
between russia and the west. how will russia's interactions with its neighbors affect u.s. calls to reset relations with moscow? >> russia will not be a success if it deludes itself into thinking that it can reconstruct its former empire. >> as former soviet satellite countries move closer to the west, is russia aiming to start a new chapter in what was once called, "the great game"? next, on great decisions. >> in a democracy agreement is not essential, but participation is. join us as we discuss today's most critical global issues. join us for great decisions. >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association- inspiring americans to learn more about the world. funding for great decisions is provided by the carnegie corporation of new york, the starr foundation, shell international, and the european commission. great decisions is produced in association with the university of delaware. >> and now from our studios, here is ralph begleiter. >> welcome to great decisions. i'm ralph begleiter. joining us to discuss russia and its neighbors are nina kruscheva, professor of inte
in europe and the possible threat in the u.s. >> brown: margaret warner examines china's growing economic and military assertiveness in asia and globally. >> they're breaking diplomatic egg which is three or four years ago they would not have broken. so i think the change is palpable. >> woodruff: we talk to former clinton administration secretary of labor robert reich-- the last in our series of conversations on extending the bush-era tax breaks. >> brown: and jonathan miller of "independent television news" reports from northwest pakistan, where relief-aid is still slow in coming two months after the floods began. >> this is one of the worst affected areas in pakistan, but these people industrial no safe water, no food, no shelter, no medicine. something has gone very wrong. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> i want to know what the universe... >> looks like. >> feels like. >> from deep space. >> to a microbe. >> i can contribute to the world by pursuing my passion for science. >> it really is the key to the
. new rules on child sex abuse, and the u.s. formally ends operations in iraq. chancellor angela merkel fears east german braverynd th country's unification set an example for the world, marking the moment that the treaty was signed two decades ago, she praised the role of civil rights activists and those who escaped the regime. the german leader grew up in the east and says it is now germany's responsibility to fight globally for freedom. >> the original unification treaty was presented to today's chancellor to commemorate its signing in the same room 20 years ago. angela merkel, who grow up in east germany, was joined ere byany politicns iolved in the deal. the interior met -- for the then interim minister, signing the treaty was the high point of his career. >> we left the room together for a moment, and then we simply cried because we were moved, exhausted, and overjoyed. >> it took just 23 minutes to end four decades of communist east german rule. unification had previously been approved by east germany's parliament. chancellor merkel was present at the proedings 20 years ago. she
parliamentary elections. some of the political players may decide to use violence themselves as a pressure point. >> lehrer: newshour correspondent spencer michels examines the impact of u.s. supreme court rulings on local gun regulations in california. >> among the first results of the supreme court decisions on guns: gun shows like this may become more common in california. >> woodruff: plus an encore lo at jeffrey brown's profile of tap dance great maurice hines passing the torch and tradition to a new generation. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: the east coast kept a weather eye on the sea today, waiting for the arrival of hurricane earl. the storm weakened some during the day, but still had winds of 115 miles an hour. in kill devil hills, north carolina, the day dawned on a relatively
of the atmosphere every year. bnsf, theen engine that connects us. >> chevron. this is the power of human energy. >> intel. sponsors of tomorrow. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation, supporting science, technology and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: president obama spent this labor day in the midwest to rally with union members and unveil a new plan to promote job growth. but even as he sharpend his focus on the economy, his political opponents sharpened their responses. >> around the nation this holiday, parades, barbecues and a continuing unease over the dismal jobs market. coming just after friday's report showing unemployment had edgeded up again to 9.6%, this was a labor day in which the state of the american work force was very much front and center. with that in mind and with a mid-term election just two months off
, corporations. >> question, by the way, the word stimulous is apparently now not used. the president's job approval rating is low. historically so. did this week put president obama back on an upward track? pat buchanan. >> no it did not, john. there's no doubt he was in campaign mode and spoke more eloquently there. he mentioned john boehner and attacked him by name seven times and nobody in the country knows who john boehner is. secondly the mosque issue and the issue of the burning korans was a tremendous distraction all week. third, his proposal, some of which are interesting, credits like that. they are too little, they are too late. frankly some of his rhetoric, they treat me like a dog is getting pity me, it doesn't come off well. >> what is the political part on obama's part? >> you have to put a face on the opposition and mr. boehner is a pretty good face. he has been in the congress since 1990. he was part of the gingrich revolution in 1995. he was video taped on the house floor handing out checks from the tocco industry to members while they were discussing ending tobacco subs
that's bold, that touches these third rails, the other side will use it as a political weapon against you so don't dare try. we have to get off, if we court start tackling the fiscal problem, it will tack ale lot. what i do the point i'm trying to make is we do this now and get our prosperity agenda. what i mean when i say this is my plan says nothing changes for anybody 35 and above. -- 55 and above, so if you are 10 years away from retiring we can guarantee your benefit, if you are 54 and below you know the programs won't be the samement you know that the social insurance safety net system we have is imploding. we need to reform it to fix it. i use a few values and principals on how i fix those things am i go kif-- i can give you details if you like. the point i make is do it now, preema debt crisis, if he kick the can down the road it will be austerity to everybody. tax increases to current workers that is the pain plan we shouldavoid that. >> rose: i meant by dismantle, just dismantle in the traditional way that it works. in other words, you can use the word change. >> words matte
plan to burn the islamic holy book to mark the ninth anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. the u.s. embassy in kabul has condemned the church's plan. elsewhere in afghanistan nato announced the u.s. soldier was skilled in fighting in the east on sunday. the fifth american death in afghanistan in september. also today it was widely reported that the top u.s. and nato commander in afghanistan has asked for 2,000 additional troops. general david petraeus wants them to join the 140,000 strong international force to help train afghan security forces. in pakistan today at least 19 people died and 40 more were wounded in a suicide bombing near a police station. the pakistani taliban claimed responsibility for the car bomb in the northwestern town. a spokesman said the bombing targeted police because they encourage residents to set up militias and fight the taliban. at least 44 people have died in landslides in guatemala, and dozens more are missing. heavy rains unleashed multiple landslides this weekend including on one of the country's main highways. rescue workers struggled today to try and free
year. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the health care reform law reached a kind of anniversary today, six months since president obama signed it into law, big new changes are set to take effect. health correspondent betty ann bowser has the story. >> hey, everybody. hello, hello! good to see you guys! >> reporter: the president marked the occasion in a northern virginia neighborhood today. his goal: to sell the six-month- old law to voters, six weeks before the mid-term elections. >> and so what we realized was we had to take some steps to start dealing with these underlying, chronic problems that have confronted our economy for a very long time. and health care was one of those issues that we could no longer i
stock prices and u.s. bleak economic outlook caused it to ease concerns about japan's committee. the representatives of 50 cities from around the world are in south korea to talk about how they can better use information technology, they're launching a council to promote i.t.-based administrative services. the city of seoul called tuesday's meeting. the south korean capital has computerized most of its services including the issuance of resident certificates. >> i expect the power of i.t. to create a wave of mutual collaboration that will reach out to every city around the world. >> the mayor also expressed hope the council would provide business opportunities for south korean firms. the meeting featured an exhibit of cutting edge service technology developed by south korea's samsung and lgl electronics, among others. it included a global positioning system monitor that shows the wait times at bus stops. also on display was a system that sends hospital prescriptions to a pharmacy online so that patients can pick up medication without a long wait. >>> japan's panasonic has develo
. >> rose: right. >> so we are used to the story and we tell the story about the way we live. we train kid dpos to go to college. we train them in reasoning skills am we give them technical skills we have a series of strategies that people learn when they go into management. how to network, how to make decisions. and that is the story of human life told from the conscious level. but the revolution of consciousness tells us that below that level there's a more important and more fundamental level and more powerful and in some ways smarter level. and so my book is a description of life and the lives of two people told from that, of that underlevel. >> rose: the lives of two people. >> yeah, i make up characters. i have fictional characters just so exempt few. >> rose: but tell us about what you have found out about the unconscious mind. >> a couple things are important. the first is that we're shaped in so many ways by these unconscious decisions. in trivial ways, i mention by a study by a guy in buffalo that people named dennis are disproportionately likely to become dentists, people named
likely year. in the late 1990s kim jong un studied in switzerland for several years. at school, he used the name pak u.n. and it is said he identified him self as theon of the north korean ambassador to switzerland. one of his former classmates says he was polite and quick to learn the german language. kim jong un apparently enjoyed playing basketball and dreamed of becoming a professional player. kim jong un is said to have returned to pyongyang around 2000 and to have attended university in the north korean capital. no information has been available on his whereabouts since that time. there is speculation that kim jong-il has chosen jong un to succeed him due to his son's leadership abilities and strong mindedness. china's special envoy to the six-party talks has said he heard that kim jong un is tall, like his grandfather, kim ill song who established communist rule in north korea. >> we are covering issues regarding the korean peninsula and thank you very much for joining us. north korea has named kim jong-il's third son vice chairman of the central military committee of the worker'
. president obama addresses the nation as the u.s. combat mission ends in iraq. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we get the analysis of mark shields and david brooks. >> lehrer: and margaret warner in baghdad examines the challenges iraqis still face in their daily lives. >> woodruff: then, from mexico city, we learn the latest on the arrest of an alleged drug lord from jason beaubien of npr. >> lerher: we have another in john merrow's reports on the washington, d.c., schools. tonight he looks at a new test for teachers. >> how can you possibly have a system where the vast majority of adults are running around thinking i'm doing an excellent job when what 're producing for kids is 8% success. >> woodruff: and jeffrey brown updates the story of new orleans musician and scholar michael white, five years after katrina. >> i went through a serious period of depression, of anger, of many different kinds of emotions. and then i came to realize the most valuable thing that i have i never lost. it's inside. it's that music tradition. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on toni
be a sign that god would want us to do it, that the american people do not want the mosque there and, of course, muslims do not want us to burn the koran . the imam has agreed to move the mosque. we have agreed to cancel our event on saturday. >> suarez: the pressure on pastor jones from around the world had been increasing on him throughout the day. just this morning, president obama added his voice to those of international leaders asking jones to call it off saying it would be a "recruitment bonanza for al qaeda." >> as commander-in-chief of the armed forces of the united states, i just want him to understand that this stunt that he is talking about pulling could greatly endanger our young men and women in uniform who are in iraq, who are in afghanistan. >> reporter: in response to fears of retaliation, the state department issued a travel warning today for citizens abroad. it also ordered u.s. embassies around the world to ramp up their security in preparation. in pakistan and afghanistan today protestors burned u.s. flags and shouted anti-american slogans in anticipation of the
to get their agenda through. they said don't run away from us yet. we're eight weeks away from election day. you see a lot of democrats in very tough districts really starting to put distance between themselves and the national democrats, president obama, speaker pelosi. >> lehrer: you also believe looking further at those polls about dissatisfaction with government. there's stuff in there that needs to be noted as well, correct some. >> awe-i have looked all year long. it's this volatility, almost anger that exists inside the electorate. take a look at these numbers because this is fascinating when you look at it through history. today 78% of respondents say tler dissatisfied or angry with government and how government works versus 22% who are satisfied or enthusiastic. compare that, jim, to november 1994. you remember bill clinton was president. newt gingrich, the republican revotion and the takeover of the house of representatives, you are seeing more dissatisfaction and anger in the electorate now than you did when republicans won 54 seats and took over the house. >> lehrer: now the
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